Drinking Low-Fat Milk May Help You Age Slower


Drinking Low-Fat Milk May Help You Age Slower

Lisa-S

Drinking low-fat milk, such as 1-percent or non-fat, may be good for more than just trimming our waistlines. A recent study conducted at Brigham Young University and published in Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity found that low-fat milk is “significantly” associated with less aging in adults. 

Specifically, the researchers found, adults who drink 1-percent age 4.5 years slower than those who drink 2-percent. “It’s not a bad thing to drink milk,” Larry Tucker, exercise science professor at BYU and head researcher on the project, said in a release. “You should just be more aware of what type of milk you are drinking.”

So why does downing creamy whole milk rather than 1-percent make your hair grey quicker? It has to do with telomeres, which sit at the end of every chromosome—aka the building blocks of life. 

[RELATED2]

Telomeres protect the chromosomes from deterioration, and as we become older they become shorter, thereby making us more susceptible to the effects of aging

There are other things that affect telomere length, such as diet, and high-fat milk is apparently one of the main culprits of shorter telomeres. Tucker and his team found that for every 1 percent increase in milk fat consumed, telomeres were 69 base pairs shorter, which translated into four additional years of biological aging. 

Most shockingly, people who drink whole milk had telomeres 145 base pairs shorter than non-fat milk drinkers, which translates into eight additional years of biological aging. 

Somewhat surprisingly, people who don’t drink milk at all had shorter telomeres than those who consume nonfat milk or 1-percent. 

The study’s authors admit there’s very little room to question why this association was found. “High-fat milk consumers may have lifestyles that are less healthy than low-fat milk drinkers,” they wrote. “Causation is a possibility, and the present findings warrant additional research in this area, but the scope of this study does not allow causal conclusions.”

The findings, Tucker added, do seem to support the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, which encourage adults to drink either nonfat or 1-percent milk if they choose to drink dairy.

[RELATED1]

No

Why Mehcad Brooks Turned Down 26 Basketball Scholarships

The 'A Fall From Grace' star talks basketball, jealousy, and a near-death experience.

Mehcad Brooks, star of the new Netflix film A Fall From Grace, explains his decision to not play basketball, how he deals with jealousy, and how his life has changed since nearly dying from a parasite.

[RELATED1]

function videoLoadCallback () {
var playerInstance = jwplayer(“botr_QE7FxUKR_7gqkdwId_div”);

setTimeout(function(){
playerInstance.setup({
playlist: “//content.jwplatform.com/feeds/QE7FxUKR.json”,
image: “//content.jwplatform.com/thumbs/QE7FxUKR-720.jpg”,
ph: 2,
advertising: {
“admessage”: “This video will resume in xx seconds”,
“client”: “googima”,
“cuetext”: “Advertisement”,
“skipmessage”: “Skip ad in xx seconds”,
“vpaidmode”: “insecure”
},
plugins: {
“https://ovp.iris.tv/plugins/jwplayer/v2/iris-jwplayer8.adaptive.min.js”: {
settings: {
player_id: “botr_QE7FxUKR_7gqkdwId_div”,
client_token: ‘ER0ZY06XV3YJHK0’,
platform_id: “QE7FxUKR”,
player_version: ‘jwplayer8’,
ssl: true,
end_up_next: true,
disable_mobile_upnext: false,
campaign_tracking: true
},
global: “iris”,
jwCMS: true,
iris_buttons: {
‘thumbs_up’: false,
‘thumbs_down’: false,
‘skip_forward’: false,
‘skip_back’: false,
‘skip_on_thumbs_down’: false
}
}
}
}).once(“play”, function(){
var playerInstance = jwplayer(“botr_QE7FxUKR_7gqkdwId_div”);
loadIrisPlugin(playerInstance, playerInstance.getConfig().plugins[“https://ovp.iris.tv/plugins/jwplayer/v2/iris-jwplayer8.adaptive.min.js”])
}).on(‘adsManager’, function (e) {
let chanIdVal = ”;
let jwpDef = jwplayer.defaults || {};

if (jwpDef.advertising) {
if (jwpDef.advertising.schedule) {
for (let j in jwpDef.advertising.schedule) {
if (jwpDef.advertising.schedule[j].tag) {
let parts = jwpDef.advertising.schedule[j].tag.split(‘iu=’);
if (2 == parts.length) {
chanIdVal = parts[1];
chanIdVal = chanIdVal.split(‘&’);
chanIdVal = chanIdVal[0];
break;
}
}
}
}
}

const {adsManager, videoElement} = e;
const iasConfig = {
anId: ‘928572’,
campId: `${jwplayer().getWidth()}x${jwplayer().getHeight()}`, // This is dynamic based on player dimensions, but can be hard coded
chanId: chanIdVal,
placementId: ‘Open Auction’,
pubOrder: ‘Video’,
pubId: ‘Direct’
};
if (googleImaVansAdapter) {
googleImaVansAdapter.init(window.google, adsManager, videoElement, iasConfig);
}
}).on(‘beforePlay’, function (e) {
var videoItem = this.getPlaylistItem();
if (typeof window.jwPlayedVideos[videoItem.mediaid] === ‘undefined’) {
window.jwPlayedVideos[videoItem.mediaid] = true;
try {
if (jwDefaults.advertising && jwDefaults.advertising.schedule[0].tag) {
window.jwVastTag = jwDefaults.advertising.schedule[0].tag;
}
} catch ( e ) {}

apstag.fetchBids({
slots: [{
slotID: ‘56226737’,
mediaType: ‘video’
}] }, function (bids) {
if (bids.length > 0) { //If we have received any bids back
try {
jwplayer(“botr_QE7FxUKR_7gqkdwId_div”).playAd(window.jwVastTag + “&scp=” + bids[0].encodedQsParams);
} catch (e) {
console.log(e);
}
} else {
jwplayer(“botr_QE7FxUKR_7gqkdwId_div”).playAd(window.jwVastTag);
}
});
}
});
}, 1000);
}
var script = document.createElement(“script”);
script.type = “text/javascript”;
script.onload = videoLoadCallback;
script.async = true;

script.src = “//content.jwplatform.com/libraries/7gqkdwId.js”;
document.getElementsByTagName(“head”)[0].appendChild(script);

JW Player ID: 
7gqkdwId

How ‘A Fall From Grace’ Actor Mehcad Brooks Improved Under Tyler Perry

"If Tyler Perry sends you a script, you f**king read it."

Mehcad Brooks, star of the new Netflix film A Fall From Grace, breaks down the dynamics of working with Tyler Perry, and what drew him to the role of Shannon.

Watch the full episode on Youtube, or stream it on all major digital platforms on Friday at 12 PM.

[RELATED1]

function videoLoadCallback () {
var playerInstance = jwplayer(“botr_XEZhoQCl_7gqkdwId_div”);

setTimeout(function(){
playerInstance.setup({
playlist: “//content.jwplatform.com/feeds/XEZhoQCl.json”,
image: “//content.jwplatform.com/thumbs/XEZhoQCl-720.jpg”,
ph: 2,
advertising: {
“admessage”: “This video will resume in xx seconds”,
“client”: “googima”,
“cuetext”: “Advertisement”,
“skipmessage”: “Skip ad in xx seconds”,
“vpaidmode”: “insecure”
},
plugins: {
“https://ovp.iris.tv/plugins/jwplayer/v2/iris-jwplayer8.adaptive.min.js”: {
settings: {
player_id: “botr_XEZhoQCl_7gqkdwId_div”,
client_token: ‘ER0ZY06XV3YJHK0’,
platform_id: “XEZhoQCl”,
player_version: ‘jwplayer8’,
ssl: true,
end_up_next: true,
disable_mobile_upnext: false,
campaign_tracking: true
},
global: “iris”,
jwCMS: true,
iris_buttons: {
‘thumbs_up’: false,
‘thumbs_down’: false,
‘skip_forward’: false,
‘skip_back’: false,
‘skip_on_thumbs_down’: false
}
}
}
}).once(“play”, function(){
var playerInstance = jwplayer(“botr_XEZhoQCl_7gqkdwId_div”);
loadIrisPlugin(playerInstance, playerInstance.getConfig().plugins[“https://ovp.iris.tv/plugins/jwplayer/v2/iris-jwplayer8.adaptive.min.js”])
}).on(‘adsManager’, function (e) {
let chanIdVal = ”;
let jwpDef = jwplayer.defaults || {};

if (jwpDef.advertising) {
if (jwpDef.advertising.schedule) {
for (let j in jwpDef.advertising.schedule) {
if (jwpDef.advertising.schedule[j].tag) {
let parts = jwpDef.advertising.schedule[j].tag.split(‘iu=’);
if (2 == parts.length) {
chanIdVal = parts[1];
chanIdVal = chanIdVal.split(‘&’);
chanIdVal = chanIdVal[0];
break;
}
}
}
}
}

const {adsManager, videoElement} = e;
const iasConfig = {
anId: ‘928572’,
campId: `${jwplayer().getWidth()}x${jwplayer().getHeight()}`, // This is dynamic based on player dimensions, but can be hard coded
chanId: chanIdVal,
placementId: ‘Open Auction’,
pubOrder: ‘Video’,
pubId: ‘Direct’
};
if (googleImaVansAdapter) {
googleImaVansAdapter.init(window.google, adsManager, videoElement, iasConfig);
}
}).on(‘beforePlay’, function (e) {
var videoItem = this.getPlaylistItem();
if (typeof window.jwPlayedVideos[videoItem.mediaid] === ‘undefined’) {
window.jwPlayedVideos[videoItem.mediaid] = true;
try {
if (jwDefaults.advertising && jwDefaults.advertising.schedule[0].tag) {
window.jwVastTag = jwDefaults.advertising.schedule[0].tag;
}
} catch ( e ) {}

apstag.fetchBids({
slots: [{
slotID: ‘56226737’,
mediaType: ‘video’
}] }, function (bids) {
if (bids.length > 0) { //If we have received any bids back
try {
jwplayer(“botr_XEZhoQCl_7gqkdwId_div”).playAd(window.jwVastTag + “&scp=” + bids[0].encodedQsParams);
} catch (e) {
console.log(e);
}
} else {
jwplayer(“botr_XEZhoQCl_7gqkdwId_div”).playAd(window.jwVastTag);
}
});
}
});
}, 1000);
}
var script = document.createElement(“script”);
script.type = “text/javascript”;
script.onload = videoLoadCallback;
script.async = true;

script.src = “//content.jwplatform.com/libraries/7gqkdwId.js”;
document.getElementsByTagName(“head”)[0].appendChild(script);

JW Player ID: 
7gqkdwId

How Mehcad Brooks’ Near-death Experience Transformed His Life

"You dig down super deep to where your strength is, and you realize there's a bottom."

Mehcad Brooks, star of the new Netflix film A Fall From Grace, explains how an undiagnosed parasite almost led to his death prior to the age of 30.

Watch the full episode on Youtube, or stream it on all major digital platforms on Friday at 12 PM.

[RELATED1]

function videoLoadCallback () {
var playerInstance = jwplayer(“botr_XzXcRcsW_7gqkdwId_div”);

setTimeout(function(){
playerInstance.setup({
playlist: “//content.jwplatform.com/feeds/XzXcRcsW.json”,
image: “//content.jwplatform.com/thumbs/XzXcRcsW-720.jpg”,
ph: 2,
advertising: {
“admessage”: “This video will resume in xx seconds”,
“client”: “googima”,
“cuetext”: “Advertisement”,
“skipmessage”: “Skip ad in xx seconds”,
“vpaidmode”: “insecure”
},
plugins: {
“https://ovp.iris.tv/plugins/jwplayer/v2/iris-jwplayer8.adaptive.min.js”: {
settings: {
player_id: “botr_XzXcRcsW_7gqkdwId_div”,
client_token: ‘ER0ZY06XV3YJHK0’,
platform_id: “XzXcRcsW”,
player_version: ‘jwplayer8’,
ssl: true,
end_up_next: true,
disable_mobile_upnext: false,
campaign_tracking: true
},
global: “iris”,
jwCMS: true,
iris_buttons: {
‘thumbs_up’: false,
‘thumbs_down’: false,
‘skip_forward’: false,
‘skip_back’: false,
‘skip_on_thumbs_down’: false
}
}
}
}).once(“play”, function(){
var playerInstance = jwplayer(“botr_XzXcRcsW_7gqkdwId_div”);
loadIrisPlugin(playerInstance, playerInstance.getConfig().plugins[“https://ovp.iris.tv/plugins/jwplayer/v2/iris-jwplayer8.adaptive.min.js”])
}).on(‘adsManager’, function (e) {
let chanIdVal = ”;
let jwpDef = jwplayer.defaults || {};

if (jwpDef.advertising) {
if (jwpDef.advertising.schedule) {
for (let j in jwpDef.advertising.schedule) {
if (jwpDef.advertising.schedule[j].tag) {
let parts = jwpDef.advertising.schedule[j].tag.split(‘iu=’);
if (2 == parts.length) {
chanIdVal = parts[1];
chanIdVal = chanIdVal.split(‘&’);
chanIdVal = chanIdVal[0];
break;
}
}
}
}
}

const {adsManager, videoElement} = e;
const iasConfig = {
anId: ‘928572’,
campId: `${jwplayer().getWidth()}x${jwplayer().getHeight()}`, // This is dynamic based on player dimensions, but can be hard coded
chanId: chanIdVal,
placementId: ‘Open Auction’,
pubOrder: ‘Video’,
pubId: ‘Direct’
};
if (googleImaVansAdapter) {
googleImaVansAdapter.init(window.google, adsManager, videoElement, iasConfig);
}
}).on(‘beforePlay’, function (e) {
var videoItem = this.getPlaylistItem();
if (typeof window.jwPlayedVideos[videoItem.mediaid] === ‘undefined’) {
window.jwPlayedVideos[videoItem.mediaid] = true;
try {
if (jwDefaults.advertising && jwDefaults.advertising.schedule[0].tag) {
window.jwVastTag = jwDefaults.advertising.schedule[0].tag;
}
} catch ( e ) {}

apstag.fetchBids({
slots: [{
slotID: ‘56226737’,
mediaType: ‘video’
}] }, function (bids) {
if (bids.length > 0) { //If we have received any bids back
try {
jwplayer(“botr_XzXcRcsW_7gqkdwId_div”).playAd(window.jwVastTag + “&scp=” + bids[0].encodedQsParams);
} catch (e) {
console.log(e);
}
} else {
jwplayer(“botr_XzXcRcsW_7gqkdwId_div”).playAd(window.jwVastTag);
}
});
}
});
}, 1000);
}
var script = document.createElement(“script”);
script.type = “text/javascript”;
script.onload = videoLoadCallback;
script.async = true;

script.src = “//content.jwplatform.com/libraries/7gqkdwId.js”;
document.getElementsByTagName(“head”)[0].appendChild(script);

JW Player ID: 
7gqkdwId

Monique Ricardo’s Shoulder-Blasting Workout Explained

Get the Jiu-Jitsu champ's hardcore routine.

Train your delts with this quick shoulder workout routine from Monique Ricardo, who transitioned from being an IFBB Pro League bikini athlete to a four-time IBJJF (International Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Federation) world champ.

function videoLoadCallback () {
var playerInstance = jwplayer(“botr_IJuxyWi4_7gqkdwId_div”);

setTimeout(function(){
playerInstance.setup({
playlist: “//content.jwplatform.com/feeds/IJuxyWi4.json”,
image: “//content.jwplatform.com/thumbs/IJuxyWi4-720.jpg”,
ph: 2,
advertising: {
“admessage”: “This video will resume in xx seconds”,
“client”: “googima”,
“cuetext”: “Advertisement”,
“skipmessage”: “Skip ad in xx seconds”,
“vpaidmode”: “insecure”
},
plugins: {
“https://ovp.iris.tv/plugins/jwplayer/v2/iris-jwplayer8.adaptive.min.js”: {
settings: {
player_id: “botr_IJuxyWi4_7gqkdwId_div”,
client_token: ‘ER0ZY06XV3YJHK0’,
platform_id: “IJuxyWi4”,
player_version: ‘jwplayer8’,
ssl: true,
end_up_next: true,
disable_mobile_upnext: false,
campaign_tracking: true
},
global: “iris”,
jwCMS: true,
iris_buttons: {
‘thumbs_up’: false,
‘thumbs_down’: false,
‘skip_forward’: false,
‘skip_back’: false,
‘skip_on_thumbs_down’: false
}
}
}
}).once(“play”, function(){
var playerInstance = jwplayer(“botr_IJuxyWi4_7gqkdwId_div”);
loadIrisPlugin(playerInstance, playerInstance.getConfig().plugins[“https://ovp.iris.tv/plugins/jwplayer/v2/iris-jwplayer8.adaptive.min.js”])
}).on(‘adsManager’, function (e) {
let chanIdVal = ”;
let jwpDef = jwplayer.defaults || {};

if (jwpDef.advertising) {
if (jwpDef.advertising.schedule) {
for (let j in jwpDef.advertising.schedule) {
if (jwpDef.advertising.schedule[j].tag) {
let parts = jwpDef.advertising.schedule[j].tag.split(‘iu=’);
if (2 == parts.length) {
chanIdVal = parts[1];
chanIdVal = chanIdVal.split(‘&’);
chanIdVal = chanIdVal[0];
break;
}
}
}
}
}

const {adsManager, videoElement} = e;
const iasConfig = {
anId: ‘928572’,
campId: `${jwplayer().getWidth()}x${jwplayer().getHeight()}`, // This is dynamic based on player dimensions, but can be hard coded
chanId: chanIdVal,
placementId: ‘Open Auction’,
pubOrder: ‘Video’,
pubId: ‘Direct’
};
if (googleImaVansAdapter) {
googleImaVansAdapter.init(window.google, adsManager, videoElement, iasConfig);
}
}).on(‘beforePlay’, function (e) {
var videoItem = this.getPlaylistItem();
if (typeof window.jwPlayedVideos[videoItem.mediaid] === ‘undefined’) {
window.jwPlayedVideos[videoItem.mediaid] = true;
try {
if (jwDefaults.advertising && jwDefaults.advertising.schedule[0].tag) {
window.jwVastTag = jwDefaults.advertising.schedule[0].tag;
}
} catch ( e ) {}

apstag.fetchBids({
slots: [{
slotID: ‘56226737’,
mediaType: ‘video’
}] }, function (bids) {
if (bids.length > 0) { //If we have received any bids back
try {
jwplayer(“botr_IJuxyWi4_7gqkdwId_div”).playAd(window.jwVastTag + “&scp=” + bids[0].encodedQsParams);
} catch (e) {
console.log(e);
}
} else {
jwplayer(“botr_IJuxyWi4_7gqkdwId_div”).playAd(window.jwVastTag);
}
});
}
});
}, 1000);
}
var script = document.createElement(“script”);
script.type = “text/javascript”;
script.onload = videoLoadCallback;
script.async = true;

script.src = “//content.jwplatform.com/libraries/7gqkdwId.js”;
document.getElementsByTagName(“head”)[0].appendChild(script);

JW Player ID: 
7gqkdwId

Shaquille O’Neal Named 2020 Honorary Olympia Ambassador


Shaquille O'Neal Named 2020 Honorary Olympia Ambassador

Andy Kropa/Invision/AP / Shutterstock

Joe Weider’s Olympia Fitness & Performance Weekend has selected Shaquille O’Neal as its Honorary Ambassador for the 2020 event. Widely regarded as one of the world’s most recognizable athletes, the selection of the Hall of Famer and four-time NBA champion is part of the Olympia’s ongoing initiative to reach new audiences, while inspiring men and women across all sports to embrace the principles of fitness and bodybuilding.

Chief Olympia Officer Dan Solomon explains, “In recent years, Shaq has become an enthusiastic supporter of Olympia Weekend.  He follows the bodybuilding scene with the same authenticity and passion that has made him one of today’s most sought after product endorsers and a powerhouse in the world of business and entertainment. Shaq was in attendance at last year’s Olympia and his relationship with the fitness community continues to evolve.”

One of the most popular athletes of his generation, Shaq’s interest in bodybuilding and fitness will also be on full display the month before Olympia Weekend when he teams up with former IFBB Professional Bodybuilder Roc Shabazz for the inaugural ROC ATLANTA EXTRAVAGANZA presented by SHAQUILLE O’NEAL. Sanctioned by the NPC and the IFBB Professional League, the August 22nd event will be held in Atlanta.

Recently named Shaq’s Chief Fitness Officer, Shabazz adds, “When Shaq puts his name on something, you know it’s gonna be big. We are planning a great experience for the fans, athletes and sponsors.”

For 55 years, Olympia Weekend has been the signature event on the fitness industry’s annual calendar. Spearheaded by attendance and sponsorship increases at the 2019 event, plans are already underway for 2020 and organizers have begun laying the groundwork for a series of upgrades to its popular arena production and convention center tradeshow.

As part of his role as Honorary Olympia Ambassador, Shaq will be promoting Olympia Weekend throughout the world while also documenting his own fitness journey to his millions of fans via social media.

Join Shaq along with the best bodies on the planet in Las Vegas September 10-13 as Trifecta presents Joe Weider’s Olympia Fitness & Performance Weekend brought to you by Wings of Strength. For more information visit MrOlympia.com.

No

Researchers Find a Cure for Man’s Mysterious Orgasm Allergy


Young-Man-Screaming-O-Face-Masturbating-Laptop-Bedroom

Lolostock / Shutterstock

Most articles concerning men and orgasms have to do with curbing it—staving off the Big O to extend pleasure, or so their female partners can climax first.

One 25-year-old man avoided them for a very different, and unfortunate reason: He was allergic to his own orgasms, according to a recent study.

“He dreaded ejaculation,” researchers wrote in the journal Urology Case Reports. Doing so would invite a torrent of symptoms: low energy, weakness, mental fog and trouble finding the right word. Talk about mind-blowing sex—in all the wrong ways.

The poor fellow began experiencing the condition at 16, when he noticed that masturbating or having sex triggered these woes. “Onset of symptoms could be immediate or delayed by 2-3 days, and would last 1-2 weeks,” the researchers wrote. As a result, the unnamed man avoided social interactions when the symptoms hit. Naturally, this affected his work and school life.

What this man had was post-orgasmic illness syndrome, or POIS. It’s rare and tough to treat. We’ve only known about POIS since 2002, when it was discovered by Marcel D. Waldinger and his team. 

Waldinger defined it as more than an allergy: it’s a systemic auto-immune response to seminal plasma, or semen. He also noted many physicians’ lack of POIS knowledge, which might lead many to dismiss symptoms as more psychological than physical, and refer their patients to a psychologist for treatment.

[RELATED1]

However, the condition and its symptoms are very much physical, and can include flu-like illness; depression; having irritated, burning eyes with blurred vision; dry mouth and muscle weakness or pain. They often emerge within a half-hour after orgasm. As POIS discoverer Waldinger found, many of his 45 subjects ended up avoiding sex and masturbation, resigned to a chaste life. He tried injecting subjects with diluted samples of their own semen as treatment, but this didn’t work.

The researchers’ subject previously tried many remedies, including diet, antihistamines, supplements and niacin. Those didn’t work either.  

The culprit with their subject, they determined, was a testosterone deficiency. Injections of hCG — dubbed “the pregnancy hormone,” but also used to help men boost testosterone production— three times a week over six weeks showed an increase in total testosterone.

And, his symptoms diminished significantly. He could orgasm without ailment. He was happy and able to masturbate regularly—and chase sex that was explosive, but didn’t blow up his life.

“Importantly, he no longer experienced dread with anticipated sexual activity,” the researchers concluded.

That’s what we call a happy ending.

[RELATED2]

No

Epi 2.0: Small Earthquake or Epic Natural Body Builder


Epi 2.0: Small Earthquake or Epic Natural Body Builder

Photo provided by Strong Supplements via Getty Images

With the growing demand for plant-based options on menus everywhere, it was only a matter of time before the trend spilled over into other aspects of the fitness arena. While botanically-derived supplements are hardly new (check out our Top 10 Natural Anabolics for more on that), there are some that bring innovation to the forefront and find ways to elevate their ingredients past the rest.

EPI 2.0 Available At Strong Supplements - Click Here

Vital Alchemy’s fan-favorite Epi 2.0 proposes to be exactly that – a plant-based muscle maker that helps reduce the body’s natural limitations on growth. The major players in Epi 2.0 are epicatechin and quercetin, flavonoids found in cocoa and tea, that have some exciting potential for those who feel stuck in their muscle building journey.

Epicatechin, a well-known compound in the industry for growth, has long played second fiddle to other ingredients because of the body’s inability to fully absorb and use it. That’s where quercetin steps in, by helping to inhibit the pathways that block epicatechin from working while also working synergistically with the epicatechin to help reduce inflammation and increase cardiovascular health 3.

Once the epicatechin is able to function at its full capacity, it begins to help raise follistatin levels, which in turn decreases myostatin, the single greatest factor in blocking your body’s ability to build muscle. Myostatin essentially determines the genetic limit at which your body stops additional growth of muscle fibers 5, and in one study epicatechin supplementation not only increased the presence of follistatin and the follistatin/myostatin ratio, but also significantly increased muscle mass when combined with resistance training 2.

In fact, epicatechin has also gained traction with women as a way to help reverse the aging process while contributing to greater strength and muscle tone 1. And Epi 2.0 ups the ante again by including sodium caprate, a compound that has been shown to help increase the permeability of larger molecules through the intestinal walls 4. Basically sodium caprate helps the body further absorb both the epicatechin and quercetin for maximum availability.

Will Epi 2.0 by Vital Alchemy help you reclaim your body’s natural muscle production and help you say sayonara to your genetic limitations? Get yours now at Strong Supplement Shop to find out.

  Sources:

This content is supplied and sponsored by StrongSupplements.com. This list was generated and created by Strong Supplement Shop. For more information, visit http://www.strongsupplements.com.

Get more from Strong Supplement Shop >>

No

Sugar May Affect the Brain Like a Drug, Study Finds


Measuring-Spoons-Sugar

knape / Getty

It’s common knowledge that sugary foods aren’t exactly good for us, but that doesn’t stop countless people from overindulging in them. Those with a sweet tooth wouldn’t hesitate to call sugar addicting, and new research published in Scientific Reports just might support that notion. 

Past studies on the notion that sugar is pretty much a drug have had mixed results, with some experts insisting that food can’t actually be addicting. But this new study, which was done on pigs, found that sugar can alter the systems in the brain that are affected by addictive drugs. Basically, when the brain is flooded with pleasure from something addictive, we learn to repeat whatever behavior made us feel good. And when scientists gave the pigs access to a sugar solution for one hour on 12 consecutive days, they saw changes in the way their brains’ reward systems worked right away. 

“After just 12 days of sugar intake, we could see major changes in the brain’s dopamine and opioid systems,” said lead study author Michael Winterdahl, associate professor at the Department of Clinical Medicine at Aarhus University in Denmark. “In fact, the opioid system, which is that part of the brain’s chemistry that is associated with well-being and pleasure, was already activated after the very first intake.” 

The study was done on pigs because previous studies have relied on rats, and pigs have more complex brains than rodents. Scientists used PET scans to see the effects that the sugar intake had on their brains. Why not humans, you ask? Well, too many things trigger our brains’ reward systems. 

“They are influenced by what we eat, whether we play games on our phones, or if we enter a new romantic relationship in the middle of the trial, with potential for great variation in the data,” Winterdahl explained. He’d actually set out to debunk the idea that sugar is addictive, and he was surprised at the findings. But it seems that there’s something to the common belief that sugar is addictive. 

“We’re all looking for the rush from dopamine,” he said, “and if something gives us a better or bigger kick, then that’s what we choose.” 

[RELATED1]

No

Wheeled Sleds vs. Traditional Sleds: Pros and Cons


Wheeled-Sled-Versus-Tradition-Sled-Gym-Fitness-Exercise-Equipment-Comparison

Courtesy of Armored Fitness Equipment/4zevar/Lebedev Roman Olegovich / Shutterstock

Sled pushes and pulls test your full-body strength and conditioning, so it’s no surprise that sleds are staples in serious gyms and sports training facilities. But there’s more than one type of sled—and as of late, people are ditching the classic ski-mounted sleds for wheeled versions. 

The metal skis on the bottom of a sled and prowler can be problematic for a host of reasons, according to Mark Rippetoe, a former competitive powerlifter who runs Starting Strength and the Wichita Falls Athletic Club. For starters, “a traditional ski sled is hard on the surface you’re pushing it on,” he says. “It’s also very sensitive to the surface on which it’s sliding,” he adds.

The skis don’t slide easily on a surface like rubber, and they’re annoyingly loud when dragged across concrete. Another downside is that external factors like the temperature, humidity, and use over time can affect the surface you’re pushing the sled on. “That’s why prowler competitions don’t exist,” Rippetoe quips. “Conditions change every time you use a sled on them.”

The best surface to push a traditional sled on is turf, which is slick and protects the ground. But if your gym doesn’t have a turf surface, a better option could be trying a sled with wheels if your gym has one. A wheeled sled creates significantly less friction with the ground, making it more efficient to push than a non-wheeled sled. But that doesn’t mean it’s easy.

“It recruits the same muscles and engages the same areas—you’re just changing the means of resistance,” says M&F Senior Fitness and Wellness Adviser Don Saladino, a New York trainer who’s gotten clients like Sebastian Stan and Ryan Reynolds into superhero shape. He equates it to pushing or pulling a truck like you see in Strongman competitions. “It doesn’t matter that it has wheels, because you’re still creating tension,” he explains. “It’s about getting into a specific position and doing a full-body compound movement that recruits your ankles, knees, hips, and shoulders.”

With non-wheeled sleds, you load the weight and rely on the gravity to create tension. The wheeled variety works differently, as some use small motors or magnetic resistance to simulate pushing a heavy load. The XPO Trainer from Armored Fitness, for example, features an “exponential resistance curve,” which is a fancy way of saying that it increases resistance the harder you push. Such sleds protect surfaces from wear and tear, remove the need for adding weight plates—though you still can for extra resistance—and transcend skill levels. Serious athletes can push until they puke, while beginners and even rehab patients can work on functional movements with an easy-to-control sled that adapts as they get stronger.

“Look, you don’t always have the luxury of pushing a traditional sled on the perfect surface,” says Saladino. At the end of the day, he urges, you just need to create tension—whether that’s pushing a fancy wheeled sled, a ski sled, or even loading up a wheelbarrow with rocks and taking that for a ride.

PROS AND CONS

Traditional Sled

Pros: 

  • Build explosive power
  • Great conditioning workout 
  • Quantify loads 

Cons:

  • Can damage surfaces
  • Loud when used on concrete 

Wheeled Sled

Pros: 

  • Build explosive power
  • Great conditioning workout
  • Use on any surface
  • Suitable for all skill levels

Cons: 

  • More difficult to quantify loads 
[RELATED1]

No

Can Aging Be Cured? Chris Hemsworth Wants to Find Out


Can Aging be Cured? Actor and Fitness Guru Chris Hemsworth Wants to Find Out.

Masatoshi Okauchi/Shutterstock

Aging and the many side effects that come along with it—such as wrinkles, decreased mobility, and fragile bones—are as inevitable as taxes. Or are they? (We’re talking about aging here—you still have to pay your taxes.)

That’s the question asked by Limitless, an upcoming National Geographic series that will be hosted and produced by actor and fitness guru Chris Hemsworth. News of the show, which does not yet have a release date, was first reported by Deadline

 

The six-episode series will examine how we can live healthier, smarter, and longer lives, with the Thor actor undergoing several experiments conducted by “longevity scientists,” who have supposedly found they key to reversing or stopping the effects of aging.  

“We’re hoping to shed some light on new ideas and emerging science with the focus on extending a healthy life span,” Hemsworth, a former Muscle & Fitness cover model, told the site. “Production starts soon, so wish me luck.”

[RELATED2]

The six episodes, Deadline reports, will focus on: regenerating damage, maximizing strength, building resilience, shocking the body, supercharging memory and confronting mortality.

“Basically, I was somehow convinced to volunteer myself as a human guinea pig and endure a series of mental and physical challenges across the globe, all for the sake of science,” Hemsworth said. 

Production studios Nutopia (the masterminds behind The World According to Jeff Goldblum) and Protozoa Pictures (founded by filmmaker Darren Aronofsky, and the studio behind Black Swan and The Wrestler) have also signed onto the project, according to Deadline

We’re certainly skeptical of the claim that aging could be “cured,” but if anyone knows how to prolong his life, it’s Hemsworth. When he’s not playing an Avenger, the Australian is busy perfecting his fitness app, Centr, which comes with workout and meal plans. 

For now, we’ll just keep training and eating right to make sure we’re here for as long as possible. 

[RELATED1]

No

See Mark Wahlberg in Netflix’s Action-Packed ‘Spenser Confidential’ Trailer


See Mark Wahlberg in Netflix’s Action-Packed ‘Spenser Confidential’ Trailer

Spenser Confidential / Netflix

Mark Wahlberg is out for revenge in the first trailer for Netflix’s Spenser Confidential. In the new film, Wahlberg plays an ex-cop who gets out of jail after five years and tries to pick up the pieces of the life he left behind—all while unraveling the conspiracy that landed him in jail in the first place.

Wahlberg is teaming up with his frequent collaborator, director Peter Berg—the two have worked on Lone Survivor, Patriots Day, Mile 22, and Deepwater Horizon—along with Black Panther star Winston Duke, who is playing Hawk, an aspiring MMA fighter. Wahlberg’s Spencer enlists Hawk, his former boxing coach Henry (Alan Arkin), and ex-girlfriend Cissy (Iliza Shlesinger) to help unravel the case, which includes dirty cops, a drug cartel, and politicians who framed Spenser for his crimes.

The film is based on the Robert B. Parker’s book series of Spenser novels, specifically Wonderland, which was written by Ace Atkins after Parker passed away. The movie has some personal significance to Wahlberg, as he used to watch the ’80s Boston-based TV show Spenser: For Hire, which was based on the character and the book series as well.

“It was actually shot in Boston, so it was really one of the few times I actually saw neighborhoods that I grew up in and that I was familiar with on television,” Wahlberg said while debuting the trailer on The Ellen DeGeneres Show.

Here’s a look at the trailer:

Along with Wahlberg, Arkin, and Duke, the film also stars Post Malone, Marc Maron, Bokeem Woodbine, Cassie Ventura, and MMA fighter Donald Cerrone.

Spenser Confidential starts streaming on Netflix on March 6, 2020.

No

Henry Cavill Is Adding Some Cardio to His Routine for a Great Cause

If you’ve already binge-watched The Witcher on Netflix, we don’t need to tell you that Henry Cavill got absolutely monstrous and ripped to prepare for the role of Geralt of Rivia. If you haven’t seen the series, here’s the shape he got in to play the Witcher:

 

 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 
 

Having a little flashback to my days in Budapest on The Witcher and found this photo. I like it because it shows that it doesn’t take huge weights everyday to achieve results. I was doing everything I could in a busy busy schedule to try and get something in, whenever I could. During this period I learned that it’s not the weight that matters, it’s the workout. So if you’re shy about going to the gym because there is always someone next to you using mahoosive weights, don’t be. You do your weights, just make every workout count. You might end up looking better than the fella or lady next to you that’s using those heavy weights. I also wanted to give a massive shout-out to Adam at Flex Gym. Adam went out of his way to help make sure I could get some training in, no matter the time of day or night, he’d open the gym so I could throw some weights (big or little!) around. Thank you my friend. I hope to see you soon! @FlexGymBudapest #YouDoYou #GymStuff

A post shared by Henry Cavill (@henrycavill) on

 

Cavill trained hard to hit his goal physique, even working with Dave Rienzi, a bodybuilding expert who also trains none other than Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson. With a second season of The Witcher on the way, Cavill is back at training, but he’s got some other goals in mind, too.

Namely, he’s working on his cardio ahead of The Durrell Challenge, a 13k (8-mile) race to benefit the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, one of Cavill’s favorite charities. The trust works to save endangered species from extinction, and it’s had quite an impact so far. 

After his first run in training for the May 17 race, Cavill shared an Instagram video to raise some awareness for the cause. 

 

 

“The first run, I will tell you, isn’t the easiest, but it’s worth it,” Cavill said in the video. The run, which will take place in Jersey (not the new one, the UK one) sounds like no joke, and even Cavill is getting a jump on training pretty early.

If you’re interested in the race or tossing a coin to the Witcher, you can sign up at doitfordurrell.com. As for Cavill, he’d better train up. If his Instagram comments are any indication, he’ll need to outrun a sea of women to finish the race.  

No

An Exclusive Interview With NXT Wrestling Superstar Roderick Strong


Roderick-Strong-Chamionship-Belt-WWE-NXT-Champion.

Courtesy of WWE

Roderick Strong’s rise to prominence in WWE may seem like a sudden success, but in truth this mat technician has been plying his trade all around the globe for 20 years. As the reigning NXT North American Champion, Strong will need every ounce of the experience he’s amassed to get past the powerful Keith Lee on Wednesday night.

Joining Adam Cole, Bobby Fish, and Kyle O’Reilly, Strong aligned himself with NXT’s The Undisputed Era faction in 2018 and is now an integral part of pro wrestling’s most decorated group. Together, the UE hold all the male titles available on NXT. The Tampa native’s winning resume was bulked up further during last November’s Survivor Series, when Strong brought bragging rights to the NXT brand as a result of beating SmackDown’s Shinsuke Nakamura and Raw’s AJ Styles in a thrilling encounter

The road to the top of sports entertainment has been a winding one for a man who first appeared on SmackDown 15 years ago as part of a “Hometown Hero” challenge against the legendary Kurt Angle. Muscle & Fitness sat down with the 36-year-old pro wrestling veteran as he reflected on his journey to NXT, thoughts on entering the 2020 Royal Rumble, attitude toward health and fitness, and his game plan for hanging on to his title. 

Your match with Keith Lee on Wednesday night is highly anticipated. How do you prepare for a big guy that weighs over 320 pounds, but can also pull off cruiserweight style maneuvers? 

I just always stay ready. Keith is a very special athlete. He’s as athletic as can be. He’s so strong, and so big but he’s never been in this type of situation before. It’s live on the USA Network, the biggest match of his career, the lights are the brightest. Is the pressure going to be too much [for him]? I don’t know. Does he have the gas tank? We’ve wrestled before but this is a situation where everything is on the line, something that means the most to me. I’m preparing myself mentally and physically for this to be the hardest match of my life.

One of your mentors was another agile big guy, the legendary Jim “The Anvil” Neidhart. What did you learn from wrestling with bigger guys?

I was 12 when I started in wrestling. I was super young and everyone was bigger than me. I used to get beat up all the time, constantly. I had to work for every single thing that I got in a match, and that’s why I am as aggressive as I am. 

It’s 15 years this very month since you first appeared on SmackDown and challenged Kurt Angle. Do you have any memories of that day? 

I remember that day to a tee. I remember all the interactions I had, speaking with Kurt. It kind of really seems like it was yesterday, which I find very funny because it was so long ago. 

I was super, super nervous but excited. For me, it was a big opportunity and I’m confident in the sense that I can do my job whatever may be asked of me, and I think I did [my job] that night. It was nice to dip my toes in that world, you know, WWE and being able to do it with an absolute legend like Kurt Angle made it that much better. I wish I would have had a chance to work with Kurt in a more competitive nature before he retired, but it’s something I will never forget. 

At this point, it is fair to call you a pro wrestling veteran and someone who younger guys and girls will look up to. Fans are enjoying a time where there is more wrestling on TV than ever before, but how important is it for wrestlers to refine their character and in-ring skills before being propelled in front of a worldwide audience?

Oh, I think its huge and its different for each person. Adam [Cole] had an idea of his character probably before he wrestled, or even trained, just because he’s that type of guy and someone like me, for the longest time I defined myself only by my in-ring work. So, I was obsessive about becoming as good as I possibly could be inside the ring. I harp on the basics more than anything. A good foundation is extremely necessary for any sport that you do. Focus on that and the rest will come. Everything will work itself out the way that it is supposed to, it just may not be as fast as you may want it to be, but that doesn’t mean it’s not going to happen. 

The roof almost blew off when you and the rest of the Undisputed Era showed up at NXT TakeOver: Blackpool II. What did you think of the crowd reaction?

Everyone talks about how awesome UK crowds are, but I really enjoy it over there. It’s something different. We don’t get exposed to [UK crowds] as often, so they make special moments even more special. I got so frikkin pumped just ripping my shirt off and dog tags, throwing them everywhere and acting like a maniac, there was just so much energy. It was amazing. It was something that we talked about for days after, and will probably talk about it forever. 

It just really depends. Obviously taking advantage of opportunities is what the Undisputed Era does, so I would want it to be with all of us. We are a package deal.

Throughout your career you have been well poised to seize any opportunity, not least by staying in consistently great shape. Can you tell us about your approach to health and fitness?

I think, maybe 7 years ago, I started taking it a little more seriously. I have a good buddy, [MMA trainer] Josh Rafferty and I’ve picked up the mentality that I am training for sport. When I figured out how to train like an athlete it made a big difference. Now I train, be it with weights, or doing varied martial arts, just anything to constantly put myself in the best shape that I possibly can. 

I’m being active five or six days a week, and then depending on the type of match I have coming up, I may go in training camp style and really focus on ‘Hey, ok I need to get just a little bit stronger,’ so I am going to lift heavier than I usually do. I try to stay in shape so that I don’t have to crash diet to get myself ready.

How do you approach nutrition?

I do intermittent fasting. I tried it in around 2011, and then again around 2 years ago and it’s something that I have stuck with since then. Sometimes I fast for 16-20 hours.

When the schedule permits, what is your favorite way to train?

I used to be just a gym guy, but now I like to get outdoors. Anywhere. I like to train outside quite a bit. I’ve also got a gym set up in my garage and backyard. My wife (former MMA star turned NXT superstar Marina Shafir) loves to train. We use kick pads, we grapple. I love the process of figuring out different things that I can do to keep myself in tip-top shape. I really fell in love with learning how to grapple and learning more about that has really helped me. I’ve been wrestling for so long, and you are always learning. 

You definitely seem ready for Keith Lee! After that, what’s next?

On Wednesday night, live, I will drop the hulk of a human, Keith Lee in what I think will be a masterful performance by me. I’m going to show, like I do every time I go out there, that there’s just no one better than me. And then, after that, whoever else wants it can get it. 2019 was a just a little taste of the Undisputed Era. In 2020 we have NXT even more on our back, the number one wrestling show in the world today. 

Roderick Strong plans to dish out a shock to the system when he defends the North American Championship this Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET on USA Network.

[RELATED1]

No

Arnold Schwarzenegger Says It Would’ve “Been Fun” to Be President


Arnold Schwarzenegger Says it Would've "Been Fun" to be President

FRANCK ROBICHON/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

Arnold Schwarzeneggerbodybuilder, actor, governor, climate change activist, and…president? It’s of course impossible for the seven-time Mr. Olympia to ever become commander-in-chief, but playing a fictional one in an upcoming movie got him thinking of what it would be like to sit in the Oval Office. 

“It would’ve been fun to sit here and to have the power and to work with the world together and solve those problems and to take on those challenges,” he said in a recent interview with The Atlantic. “Yeah, of course I think about that.”

While the Austrian-born Schwarzenegger was able to serve as California’s governor, the Constitution requires any president to be a natural-born citizen of this country. So unfortunately, we’ll never see Arnold’s bulging biceps in the Situation Room. 

But in Kung Fury 2, an upcoming martial arts comedy film to be released sometime later this year, we get to see what that could’ve been like. In it, Arnold plays a cigar-smoking president alongside David Hasselhoff, Michael Fassbender, and Alexandra Shipp. 

“So since we don’t have comprehensive immigration reform, and a foreign-born citizen cannot run for president, it’s fun to play [a president],” he said.

[RELATED1]

Arnold says he can’t complain too much about the fact that he can never be a real-life president. “I also think about, ‘Wait a minute, you can’t really complain about it too much,’ because everything that was accomplished in my life was because of America,” he told The Atlantic. 

That also hasn’t stopped him from giving his input on presidential matters—he’s a staunch critic of President Donald Trump. In his interview, he says he, not Trump, is a true Republican. 

“If you look at Ronald Reagan or President Nixon or President Lincoln, these were people that were fighting for equality,” he said. “I’m inclusive. I see myself as that.” Schwarzenegger once also famously said that Trump, “wants to be me.” 

“I don’t think he’s happy in his own skin,” he said at the Atlantic Festival last year. “He wants to be a great, studly guy that looks good and is muscular, doesn’t have a gut sticking out—all of those things.” 

Kung Fury 2 is a sequel to the 2015 short film Kung Fury, which tells the tale of the toughest martial artist cop who goes back in time to defeat the worst criminal of all— Kung Führer, aka Adolf Hitler.

In Kung Fury 2, a mysterious villain emerges to try to help the Führer obtain the ultimate weapon and rule the world. Kung Fury, the titular character, must travel through time and space to defeat evil once and for all. 

[RELATED2]

No

Rebel Wilson Is Starting a ‘Year of Health’ Strong

With the New Year in full swing, it seems everyone is set on living their healthiest lives. That includes actress Rebel WIlson, who has been going hard in the gym with the help of celebrity trainer Jono Castano

In a recent Instagram post, Castano shared a photo of Wilson smiling along with a video of her slamming some battle ropes like a champ. The Pitch Perfect star looks to be in the best shape of her life, and in the caption, Castano applauded WIlson for hitting the gym every day. 

 

 

This comes a few weeks after WIlson put up a post of her own and revealed that this year, she’s taking her health more seriously.

“Okay so for me 2020 is going to be called ‘The Year of Health,'” she captioned a set of photos of herself walking on the beach. She explained that she’s working on making positive changes in 2020, like focusing on exercise, hydration, and healthy eating.

The actress had already lost eight pounds in four days while filming Cats, due to the hot sets and intense dance sequences, she told Entertainment Tonight.

Check out the full post here:

 

 

Those are changes that anyone can make, and WIlson got a huge response from fans. More than 612,000 people liked the post, and more than 8,500 people commented on it. Plenty of people shared their health goals, and others simply commented that Wilson looks great. 

We can’t wait to see updates on WIlson’s journey, and we’re sure there will be plenty. If you need some guidance while you reach for new goals this year, check out some of our goal-centric guides below: 

 

[RELATED1] [RELATED2] [RELATED3]

No

How Christopher Evangelou Got Fit for His Role in ‘The Gentlemen’

Chris-Evangelou-Boxing

Tgsphoto/Shutterstock / Shutterstock

In his biggest film role since becoming an actor, Christopher Evangelou’s name could easily have gotten lost in a who’s who cast of A-listers in The Gentlemen. Director Guy Ritchie’s all-star ensemble—starring Matthew McConaughey, Charlie Hunnam, Colin Farrell, and Hugh Grant—could’ve made most cinema cubs a bit nervous, but after Ritchie, a BJJ black belt himself, recognized the former British welterweight champion, it made the big-screen filming experience much smoother.

“[Ritchie] came over to me, and we started talking about fighting,” Evangelou says. “He knew who I was, so there never was any awkward moments.” The Gentlemen is about a British drug lord who tries to sell off his empire to a dynasty of Oklahoma billionaires. In the film, Evangelou plays “Primetime,” a scrappy, gangster-type fella. “He’s kind of a gypsy street fighter,” he says. “He has kind of that Tyson Fury type of dialect.” 

Evangelou may be new to the silver screen, but he’s no newb in the world of combat. He holds a pro record of 13–3 and headlined a fight card at London’s Wembley Stadium in 2013, a year before he won the British welterweight title. While champion, Evangelou, who also wrote and starred in the short film Shadow Boxer (written by Evangelou, co-produced by David Hepburn, directed by Ross McGowan, and screenplay by Craig McDonald-Kelly) received a surprise call from the handlers of legend Floyd Mayweather, who wanted him to fly to Las Vegas to help with sparring—and to possibly take his boxing career stateside. 

“It would’ve been huge,” Evangelou says. However, he was training with a broken hand, and it became severely damaged during the sparring session. As a result, he was forced to retire. That’s when he shifted his focus to acting.

“It worked out well in the end,” he says. While Evangelou still works as a boxing instructor in London, his training nowadays centers more on bodybuilding. He proudly says he’s leg pressing more than 1,000 pounds. “I make sure to take the day off before leg day,” he says. “It’s brutal.”

Weighing at 176 pounds, Evangelou says he’s leg pressing more than 1,000 pounds thanks to this leg workout. 

Evangelou’s Leg-Training Regimen

DIRECTIONS: Evangelou says to keep the reps and sets the same, but increase the weight with each set.

No

Hafþór Björnsson Deadlifts 953 Pounds Twice

Hafþór Björnsson, aka “The Mountain” from Game of Thrones, is just getting stronger and shows no signs of slowing down. As he prepares to defend his Arnold Strongman Classic title in Columbus, OH in March, the 2018 World’s Strongest Man has been posting some crazy lifts on Instagram. 

Most recently, the Icelandic giant managed to deadlift 953 pounds not once, but twice in quick succession. Check it out here: 

 

It was only two weeks ago that Björnsson amazed the Internet by deadlifting 888 pounds for two sets of two reps. This lift has only upped the ante. 

He’s teased on his YouTube channel that he’s aiming to lift over 500kg (1,102 pounds) sometime in 2020. While he still has about 150 pounds to go, it seems as if he’s the one to break Eddie Hall’s near-four-year-old world record. 

That would only increase the tension between the two strongmen, who may potentially box each other soon

In his quest to become a three-time Arnold Strongman Classic champion, Hafþór isn’t just focusing on deadlifts. He also posted an impressive 3×3 incline bench with 440 pounds. 

 

He’s also toyed with the idea of breaking his own world record in the sandbag toss, which he set in 2017 when he managed to get a 100-pound bag over a 15-foot bar. It’s unclear how much he’s aiming for this time, but in a recent YouTube video he got an 88-pound bag to go over his gym’s second-floor balcony with relative ease. 

One thing’s for sure—we’ll be writing a lot about Björnsson in the lead up to the Strongman Classic. Stay tuned. 

 

No

James Grage’s Resistance-Band Only Chest Workout Explained

Lower your chances of injury by ditching the dumbbells for resistance bands.

Building a better and bigger chest doesn’t always require a gym and heavy weights. Try this resistance band workout from James Grage that you can perform at home with minimal equipment. 

[RELATED1]

function videoLoadCallback () {
var playerInstance = jwplayer(“botr_esz1Kwjc_7gqkdwId_div”);

setTimeout(function(){
playerInstance.setup({
playlist: “//content.jwplatform.com/feeds/esz1Kwjc.json”,
image: “//content.jwplatform.com/thumbs/esz1Kwjc-720.jpg”,
ph: 2,
advertising: {
“admessage”: “This video will resume in xx seconds”,
“client”: “googima”,
“cuetext”: “Advertisement”,
“skipmessage”: “Skip ad in xx seconds”,
“vpaidmode”: “insecure”
},
plugins: {
“https://ovp.iris.tv/plugins/jwplayer/v2/iris-jwplayer8.adaptive.min.js”: {
settings: {
player_id: “botr_esz1Kwjc_7gqkdwId_div”,
client_token: ‘ER0ZY06XV3YJHK0’,
platform_id: “esz1Kwjc”,
player_version: ‘jwplayer8’,
ssl: true,
end_up_next: true,
disable_mobile_upnext: false,
campaign_tracking: true
},
global: “iris”,
jwCMS: true,
iris_buttons: {
‘thumbs_up’: false,
‘thumbs_down’: false,
‘skip_forward’: false,
‘skip_back’: false,
‘skip_on_thumbs_down’: false
}
}
}
}).once(“play”, function(){
var playerInstance = jwplayer(“botr_esz1Kwjc_7gqkdwId_div”);
loadIrisPlugin(playerInstance, playerInstance.getConfig().plugins[“https://ovp.iris.tv/plugins/jwplayer/v2/iris-jwplayer8.adaptive.min.js”])
}).on(‘adsManager’, function (e) {
let chanIdVal = ”;
let jwpDef = jwplayer.defaults || {};

if (jwpDef.advertising) {
if (jwpDef.advertising.schedule) {
for (let j in jwpDef.advertising.schedule) {
if (jwpDef.advertising.schedule[j].tag) {
let parts = jwpDef.advertising.schedule[j].tag.split(‘iu=’);
if (2 == parts.length) {
chanIdVal = parts[1];
chanIdVal = chanIdVal.split(‘&’);
chanIdVal = chanIdVal[0];
break;
}
}
}
}
}

const {adsManager, videoElement} = e;
const iasConfig = {
anId: ‘928572’,
campId: `${jwplayer().getWidth()}x${jwplayer().getHeight()}`, // This is dynamic based on player dimensions, but can be hard coded
chanId: chanIdVal,
placementId: ‘Open Auction’,
pubOrder: ‘Video’,
pubId: ‘Direct’
};
if (googleImaVansAdapter) {
googleImaVansAdapter.init(window.google, adsManager, videoElement, iasConfig);
}
}).on(‘beforePlay’, function (e) {
var videoItem = this.getPlaylistItem();
if (typeof window.jwPlayedVideos[videoItem.mediaid] === ‘undefined’) {
window.jwPlayedVideos[videoItem.mediaid] = true;
try {
if (jwDefaults.advertising && jwDefaults.advertising.schedule[0].tag) {
window.jwVastTag = jwDefaults.advertising.schedule[0].tag;
}
} catch ( e ) {}

apstag.fetchBids({
slots: [{
slotID: ‘56226737’,
mediaType: ‘video’
}] }, function (bids) {
if (bids.length > 0) { //If we have received any bids back
try {
jwplayer(“botr_esz1Kwjc_7gqkdwId_div”).playAd(window.jwVastTag + “&scp=” + bids[0].encodedQsParams);
} catch (e) {
console.log(e);
}
} else {
jwplayer(“botr_esz1Kwjc_7gqkdwId_div”).playAd(window.jwVastTag);
}
});
}
});
}, 1000);
}
var script = document.createElement(“script”);
script.type = “text/javascript”;
script.onload = videoLoadCallback;
script.async = true;

script.src = “//content.jwplatform.com/libraries/7gqkdwId.js”;
document.getElementsByTagName(“head”)[0].appendChild(script);

JW Player ID: 
7gqkdwId

Honor, Respect, Discipline: Kamaru Usman’s Code


Kamaru Usman

Zuffa LLC / Jeff Bottari

When Kamaru Usman stepped into the Octagon with Colby Covington at UFC 245, he wasn’t just fighting to defend his welterweight title—it was personal. Leading up to their bout, Covington didn’t pull any stops when it came to the line-crossing trash talk he’s notorious for, taking shots at everything from Usman’s Nigerian heritage to his late manager Glenn Robinson.

The vocally MAGA-supporting Covington levied several blew-the-belt insults at Usman, boasting about his support from the Trump family and asking if Usman got calls from “the chief tribe of Nigeria with smoke signals.” In response to Usman’s claim that he’s “more American” than Covington, he said, “What has his family ever done for America beside serve in the Federal penitentiary?” But the only thing that snuck its way under Usman’s skin was when he brought Robinson into their beef, saying, “[Usman] was ducking me so long that Glenn Robinson died from it because he was ducking me so hard and wouldn’t fight me.” Robinson passed away suddenly from a heart attack in September 2018.

On December 14, 2019 Usman got the final word when he responded by wiring Covington’s jaw shut. He defeated Covington by TKO in the fifth round, breaking his jaw in the process. It was poetic justice for Usman, who admits that the insults helped fuel his fight once he was in the Octagon, but had otherwise stayed largely silent.

Speaking to Usman, it’s clear that he keeps his edge confined to the cage and the gym. In everyday life, the Nigerian-born, Texas-raised bruiser is gracious and articulate. He spoke to Muscle & Fitness about his career, preparing for fights, and his surprising backup career.

Kamaru Usman

Leading up to this fight, things got pretty personal. Can you talk about that and do you think it helped fuel your win?

Things got personal because Colby’s the kind of individual that doesn’t have the integrity to preserve what it means to be a mixed martial artist. The principles of what martial arts were built upon are honor, respect, and discipline. And nowadays we have guys who are solely focused on the entertainment aspect of the game and they throw away all of those principles.

I think he felt like the more disrespectful he got, he would be able to rattle me and pull me out of character and get me angry enough to fight emotionally. Fighting for me is about competition. I chose to go into this because I had a burning desire to compete and be the best, and these guys don’t understand. So, he said everything that he said. I just told myself, “OK, I’ll put that one in the bank.” Kind of like when officers read you your Miranda rights: Anything you say can and will be used against you when we are locked inside that Octagon.

I’m all about this competition. People aren’t going to beat me in any aspect of this game. When a guy like him is such a loud mouth, it makes it so much easier for me because you’re just given all the momentum and all that motivation that I need to really want to punish you. And he did just that.

What made you decide to go into mixed martial arts?

I made the decision during my final years as a wrestler at the Olympic training center. I had been introduced to mixed martial arts in college early on, but I was still kind of afraid of it. In wrestling, it’s pretty controlled, so I had that initial fear of not being in a controlled sport. But I knew that I had to leave the Olympic training center after 2012 because I had suffered a few injuries and the possibility of making the Olympic team was starting to slip.

I was being real with myself and thought, “OK, what am I going to do here? I need to do something else because I still have this burning desire to compete.” I was very interested in boxing, so I decided to start boxing and grind through another four-year cycle to try to make the Olympic team in boxing, which is ridiculous. When I eventually left the training center, I thought, “Am I going to just give up this skill that I have spent 12 years building? Or am I going to go into a sport that allows me to still uses wrestling principles and incorporates boxing, which I’m starting to fall in love with?” After that, it was a no-brainer. And with guys like Rashad Evans calling me and telling me I should be doing this, it made it an easy decision for me to go into mixed martial arts.

How do you prepare for fights? Is there anything specific you did as far as training and nutrition to prepare for your fight with Covington?

I’ll be honest, I don’t really do anything crazy special at all. I work the way that I work. The only difference this time was I brought in a wrestler. I brought in my former trading partner who wrestled with Colby Covington while they were at college together, and I also brought in former NCAA champion Jason Tsirtsis. They gave me that extra push with my wrestling to keep me sharp and keep me honest.

My nutrition was similar to what it’s been, which is working with Trifecta. I work with Clint [Wattenberg, director of nutrition at the UFC Performance Institute]. He did a full assessment of what my needs are because the same plan doesn’t work for everyone. For someone like myself, I’m extremely lean, and my body requires food that fuels the high level of endurance that fits my fighting style.

Kamaru Usman

Speaking of Trifecta, tell me about your relationship with them and what attracted you to them.

I’ve always cooked for myself all through my career. I like to cook. But the higher you get in your career, the bigger the fight, the more stakes are on the line, and it makes it harder to cook for myself. I was looking for a convenient meal plan company that could step in to help me, but also make sure I was eating quality food.

I reached out to Clint and he told me that there’s this great company Trifecta that [the UFC] is starting to work with that he thinks would be a good fit for me. And Clint’s somebody I trust—he was a wrestler at the highest level at Cornell. So, I said, “Let’s give it a shot.” And I’ve been with them now for my last three fights, which happened to be my three biggest fights. I still like to cook, so I opt for the a la carte option, which means I get all the bulk, pre-prepared ingredients and I can assemble my own meals. I can put things over a hot stove to give myself that illusion of cooking it—I still love to do that. But it’s so much simpler now that the food’s already there and available and I don’t have to worry about getting the right macros and going grocery shopping.

If you hadn’t gotten into MMA, what would you be doing?

I would be a marriage counselor.

Really? Marriage counselor?

It’s just something that I was passionate about in college. One of my favorite things to study was family studies. I loved it so much because you got the chance to study the child—the infant, the adolescent, and that development to the aging adult. I really started to see the effects of the family structure and what it does to each individual, what it does to a child. And it just basically got to see the importance of a marriage and a family to build a strong foundation.

All throughout my life, I’ve always been that guy that people come to for advice. I guess I’m something of a rational to a fault. Even in my own situations if I’m the one who’s at fault, I can step back and say, “OK, I was wrong.” So, I was always the guy that all my roommates in college came to for relationship advice. And even my parents, to this day, I’m the one they complain to—when mom’s sick of dad, she wants to call me and talk to me about it, and when dad’s sick of mom, he calls me to talk to me about it. So, that was one of my things. The divorce rate in this country is really scary and I wanted to be part of that solution.

Kamaru Usman

How are you feeling now that you’ve had some time to process this fight?

I’m a pretty rational person, and this victory, this last fight was huge for me because I had the weight of the world on my shoulders. Everywhere I went, I couldn’t go anywhere without people telling me how much they dislike this guy and they needed me to hurt this guy. And for my former manager, that was something that was very personal. Glenn was a guy who essentially kicked off my career and helped me get to the point where I did make it to the UFC. Him passing was very heartbreaking.

Having my opponent mention that and poke fun at that just showed how classless he is and how low an individual can go just for entertainment. That was very personal, and if I did it for nothing else, I had to go out there and do it for him. I know he’s looking down on us right now, smiling.

Photo credits (from top to bottom): Ryan Loco; Chris Millington; Zuffa LLC / Chris Unger

No

Recover with CBD


Image ID: 1449272864, CBD Dripper

Karen Culp / Shutterstock
Sponsored by Forest Remedies

CBD and Exercise

No question about it, CBD is the wellness product of the moment. Scientists are researching how CBD may be effective in supporting the body’s natural regulation of exercise-induced inflammation. CBD also is being studied for its potential benefits on occasional sleeplessness and anxiety.

The Scoop on CBD

Cannabidiol (CBD) is a naturally-occurring compound in the Cannabis sativa plant that may support the body’s natural regulation for feeling relaxed and calm.

Highest Quality, Broad Spectrum U.S. Grown Hemp!

This new crop of soothing balms by Forest Remedies may be your new best thing! Forest Remedies Soothing Balms are made from the highest quality broad spectrum hemp extracts. Plus 100% of the ingredients come from natural sources. We love their environmentally friendly packaging, plus the Mint balm is so refreshing. Try the Natural balm too, and see which one you like best!

Forest Remedies Soothing Balms—in Mint and Natural—are available at Albertsons.

Find other products online at www.forestremedies.com.

No

Intermittent Fasting May Benefit More Than Your Physique


Intermittent Fasting

everydayplus / Shutterstock

Intermittent fasting is one of the many diets that tends to gain traction as gym-goers everywhere work toward their new year’s fitness goals. And whether weight loss or better overall health is what you’re aiming for, a new study review in The New England Journal of Medicine concluded that intermittent fasting, unlike many other fad diets, has substantial scientific evidence to back it up. 

It can be done in different ways, but the two most common types of intermittent fasting are daily time-restricted feeding and 5:2 intermittent fasting, according to study author Mark Mattson, Ph.D., a neuroscientist at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Time-restricted feeding is when you only eat in a certain window each day (usually 6-8 hours), and the 5:2 strategy is when you’re limited to just one moderate-sized meal on two days each week.

Mattson has studied intermittent fasting for 25 years and has practiced it for 20, according to a release. He says the new article is meant to give some clarity to the science and uses for the diet. 

Cellular health is a notable benefit seen in animal and some human studies. That’s because alternating between fasting and eating causes the body to switch between using readily accessible, sugar-based fuel and burning fat for energy, according to Mattson. 

Studies have suggested that the aforementioned switch can help with blood sugar regulation and lower inflammation. In two studies of 100 overweight women, those who followed the 5:2 iteration of intermittent fasting lost more belly fat and had better insulin sensitivity than those who simply reduced their calories. 

Both human and animal studies have also shown that IF lowers blood pressure, blood lipid levels, and resting heart rates—all good things for long-term health.

“We are at a transition point where we could soon consider adding information about intermittent fasting to medical school curricula alongside standard advice about healthy diets and exercise,” Mattson says. 

Despite the benefits Mattson highlights in the article, he admits that more research is necessary and that intermittent fasting just isn’t a viable option for some people. But in a sea of diet trends, it seems that intermittent fasting may have at least some science to back it up.

[RELATED1]

No

Get the February 2020 Issue of ‘Muscle & Fitness’


Get the February 2020 Issue of 'Muscle & Fitness'

Photo by Danny Clinch

The February 2020 issue of Muscle & Fitness has all the workout and nutrition tips you need to fill out that winter coat without adding any unwanted fat

Country superstar Tim McGraw has recently spent more time working on his six-pack abs than singing about and drinking six-packs of beer. The 52-year-old “Live Like You Were Dying” singer spoke to us about how his fitness journey started with his family worrying about his health, and the workout routine that’s turned him into a lean, mean country music machine. 

Steve Cook is working to change lives as the Blue Team’s newest trainer on the popular weight-loss program The Biggest Loser. But 10 years ago, it was this magazine that changed his. Cook recalls how an M&F male model search inspired him to work toward a Steve Reeves-esque physique, and how being on the cover helped him launch a career in fitness. 

We also feature one-armed Bellator fighter Nick Newell, The Gentleman star Christopher Evangelou, UFC legend Tito Ortiz, and Super Bowl champion Greg Jennings, who is now training to become a bodybuilder. 

In our Train section, we preach about the benefits of a cable preacher curl, compare three variations of the incline press to find out which one’s best for your goals, and break down Bruce Lee’s favorite ab move—the dragon flag. 

Find out how to drink while keeping your gains, and whether you should go for tofu or tempeh on meatless Monday in our Eat section. 

Sometimes you don’t have an hour to waste in the gym, so we provide you with ten 10-minute workouts to build strength in record time. Speaking of quick, we have a story with five soup recipes to keep you nourished without having to spend all day in the kitchen. And since Muscle & Fitness includes FLEX, you’ll also get the latest bodybuilding news, as well as even more workout and nutrition tips.

In honor of German bodybuilding giant Günter Schlierkamp turning 50 on February 2, we revisit how he managed to defeat “The King” Ronnie Coleman at the 2002 GNC Show of Strength—still considered to be the biggest bodybuilding upset of all time. 

 2019 Olympia Men’s Physique runner-up Andre Ferguson shares his simple ab routine; IFBB Pro League competitor Jeremy Potvin explains how fitness kept him grounded during his military service; the world record holder for raw bench press, Julius Maddox, breaks down his journey to 800; and Internet sensation Simeon Panda breaks down how to obtain a superhero-like look. 

Pick up the February edition for all this and more! Whatever your fitness goals are, we’ve got all the tips you need right here in Muscle & Fitness and FLEX.

GET THE NEW ISSUE OF MUSCLE & FITNESS ON NEWSSTANDS NOW!

No